How Does Celliant Work?

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You may have heard about Celliant, a proprietary fiber used in some bedding. You can even check it out in our Bear mattress and Amerisleep mattress reviews.

But what is it exactly? What does it actually do and how does it work? Here’s everything you need to know.

Amerisleep Liberty Bed Cover
The Amerisleep Liberty mattress cover features Celliant in the fabric.

Celliant itself is a blend of minerals available in a raw fiber or loaded into yarns or fabrics.

According to the website celliant.com, the 13 thermo-reactive minerals in Celliant include titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, and aluminum oxide. Plus, Celliant doesn’t wash out or break down so any pre-loaded fabrics don’t require any special care.

The basic idea: Celliant takes your body’s wasted energy and turns it into infrared energy.

According to Celliant’s creators, the technology “recycles and converts radiant body heat into something that gives the body a measurable boost — infrared energy.”

Apparently, much of the energy we consume is lost to escaping body heat. Celliant harnesses that body heat.

Instead of trapping it or venting it, as other performance fabrics do, the Celliant minerals transform body heat into infrared energy and emit it back into your muscles and tissues.

And infrared energy has proven health benefits.

Research shows that infrared light is a vasodilator, which means it widens blood vessels to increase circulation and tissue oxygen levels. The creators claim: “Hospitals and doctors commonly use infrared light as a therapeutic treatment for conditions ranging from high blood pressure and congestive heart failure to muscle tears and rheumatoid arthritis.”

And in a press release, Michael R Hamblin, principal investigator at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, explained: “Science has shown that infrared energy increases blood flow, improves muscle recovery and reduces long-term pain.”

The technology has been through nine clinical trials, and is FDA-approved.

The science behind Celliant seems pretty solid — you can check out some of the clinical trials on the website.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determined this week that Celliant products count as medical devices and general wellness products because they “temporarily promote increased local blood flow at the site of application in healthy individuals.”

It won’t increase your body temperature.

In fact, increasing blood flow makes it easy for your body to regulate your core temp. So don’t worry about overheating under some Celliant-loaded sheets.

And finally, there are some great implications for sleep.

One pilot study found that people fell asleep an average of 15 minutes faster when using a mattress topper containing Celliant. The subjects in the study also slept an average of 42 minutes less, suggesting that sleeping on a Celliant product led to better-quality sleep.

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Joe Auer

Joe Auer is the editor of Mattress Clarity. He mainly focuses on mattress reviews and oversees the content across the site. He likes things simple and take a straightforward, objective approach to his reviews. Joe has personally tested nearly 100 mattresses and always recommends people do their research before buying a new bed. He has been testing mattresses for over 4 years now, so he knows a thing or two when it comes to mattress selection. He has been cited as an authority in the industry by a number of large publications. When he isn't testing sleep products, he enjoys working out, reading both fiction and non-fiction, and playing classical piano. He enjoys traveling as well, and not just to test out hotel mattresses! Joe has an undergraduate degree from Wake Forest University and an MBA from Columbia University.

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